abstract art pumpkins

abstract art pumpkins abstract art pumpkins abstract art pumpkins abstract art pumpkins abstract art pumpkins abstract art pumpkins abstract art pumpkins We were trying to figure out how we wanted to trick out our little pumpkins. We thought about making them a little witch hat and drawing witch faces, or painting them black, or turning them into little vases. In the end, the girls just wanted to paint them. We picked out some pretty colors of craft paint and they made their own little abstract art on the pumpkins.

They were proud of their creations and were asking for more pumpkins to paint. I especially love the messy strokes of paint that ended up on the scratch paper; I think it makes cute wall art. Looking at the pumpkins from the top, they kind of look life flowers.

What do you to decorate your pumpkins? Michael’s is having #trickyourpumpkin contest, so if you share your decorated pumpkins on Instagram, use #TrickYourPumpkin #sweepstakes and tag @MichaelsStores to enter. Get more information on it here.

I’m so happy it’s Friday! This week has felt extra long.

 

 

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diy: woodland gnome costume

woodland gnome Woodland Gnome Costume

Supplies:
Gnome Beard Template
1/4 yard of silky fleece
1 yard of blue cotton fabric
1/4″ braided elastic
Paper mache cone
Red paint
Hole puncher
Scissors
Sewing machine
Coordinating thread

Seam allowance: 1/4″

woodland gnome Directions:
1. Paint your cone. We did two coats of red. Once it is completely dry, punch a small hole on one side of the cone for the elastic, and then another hole directly across for the other elastic end. Cut the elastic to a length that would be appropriate for your child’s head (or whoever is going to be wearing it), insert each end through the hole, and knot to secure.

woodland gnome woodland gnome 2. Using the Gnome Beard Template, cut out the beard from the silky fleece fabric. After it is cut, shake off the beard to rid of any excess fleece fibers. Cut the elastic to a length that would be appropriate to be worn on top of the ears and around the back of the head. For my child, 9″ was a sufficient length for the elastic to be snugly worn around. Sew each end of the elastic in its place (see template for placement).

woodland gnome 3. Using a loose shirt or dress as a guide, add an extra 1″ for the seam allowance, and cut out your gnome top in a kimono-like shape. With the right sides together, sew along the shoulders and down the sides of the shirt, turn right side out, and press. I left the neckline, bottom, and sleeve openings raw and unfinished. If unfinished edges drive you crazy, go ahead and fold those openings in 1/4″, press, fold another 1/2″, press, and then edge stitch around.

Typically, I would wash the fabric before sewing, press it, then cut out my pattern and sew it together. This time though, I skipped all of that. I was going for fast and easy!

woodland gnome woodland gnome woodland gnome There you have it… the basics for a whimsical gnome costume. We already had some brown leggings, so we just used that for pants, I cut out a strip of black fabric to be used as a belt, and our gnome was complete. The tricky thing is getting your child to wear the beard (at least it was for me)! She refused to wear it under her nose, so I gladly settled for under her chin. If you think your child won’t want to wear it under his/her nose, don’t bother cutting out a place for their mouth, but as you can see here, you can’t even really see the hole that was cut out for it. And if I were going to do it again, I would have used black elastic instead so it would hide in her hair well.

woodland gnome woodland gnome woodland gnome woodland gnome Make some woodland animal masks for the rest of the family and then you’re ready for a cohesive family costume, or you can even go for Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. I called this a woodland gnome, but it most certainly could be a garden gnome, and you could make everyone else wear flower masks made from paper plates or something garden-y like that. In addition, I think making the gnome hats and beards would be cute for a woodland or garden party. My friend threw this woodsy one-derland party recently, and I wish I had this costume idea then to share with her.

We are not quite done making our costumes for this year, but I’m excited to share with you the story True wrote for it. As cute as Glow is as a woodland gnome, she won’t be appearing as a gnome for this year’s Halloween story. Do you have your costumes for this year figured out?

This post is part of the Michael’s Maker’s Series.
October-Challenge-Creative

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diy: funny faces wooden blocks

funny face wooden blocks Funny Face Wooden Blocks
inspired by these facemaker wooden blocks by miller goodman

Supplies:
25 wooden blocks
Paint in various colors
Paintbrushes
Painter’s tape
Pencil

funny face blocks Directions:
First, I drew out a 5×5 grid on paper. On the grid, I drew the face I wanted to create. Next, I drew that face on the blocks, following the shapes I drew on the grid. After the shapes were drawn on the blocks, I painted each piece. Each face was covered in two layers of paint. I allowed that face to dry completely before moving onto the next face.

For my second face, I drew that out on the grid again, transferred my drawing onto the blocks, and then painted the face. In all, I created 6 different faces using the same 25 blocks.

Notes: I used painter’s tape to help with some straight edges for the eyes and nose. I wasn’t going for perfection, so I didn’t always tape off the block edges when painting. Though if you want perfect painted edges, use the painter’s tape.

funny face blocks funny face blocks funny face blocks funny face blocks funny face blocks funny face blocks funny face blocks funny face blocks My girls love playing with blocks, so I thought this set would be fun to have displayed on the coffee table. Sure enough, since it’s been out, it’s been played with everyday. They’ve mixed and matched some funny faces, and even used it to play with their My Little Ponies. It’s inspired by this block set, but I had some blocks in my craft stash, so I figured we could make our own. If you package it up all cute, it would make a cool handmade gift.

I’ve always love this Miller Goodman set too, this stack and scare set is adorable, and I think this architectural set is interesting. These magnetic wood blocks are kind of cool and I’m thinking Brave might like it for Christmas. The girls are making their Christmas wish lists already, so that’s why I have Christmas gifts on my brain. Have you started Christmas shopping already?

 

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duct tape pencil holders

duct tape canister duct tape canister I love this easy DIY that Mer Mag did for Minted, so one afternoon, the girls and I made our own for our homeschool table. The project just involved cardboard canisters, one was a coco powder container and the other meringue powder container, and duct tape. I didn’t follow the DIY exactly since we did a different pattern, and also I thought that using an X-acto knife wasn’t as kid friendly, so we used my non-stick scissors instead. They are a must when trying to cut shapes from duct tape. We even used scented duct tape and the girls were ooh-ing and ahh-ing over it! The colorful containers were the perfect thing to house our pencils.

 

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glow’s birthday dress

Glow's 3rd birthday Glow's 3rd birthday Glow's 3rd birthday I quickly sewed this up last Friday afternoon for her birthday dress (the next day). I originally wanted the girls to draw animals and then hand embroider their drawings, but there just wasn’t time. I did an elastic collar and waist, it was originally supposed to have longer sleeves, but I got scissor happy and cut them off one side, so I had to do it to the other, but then one side happened to be shorter than the other, so oh well. It ended up cute anyway. The girls said the top looked like lemur tails, so I guess it was perfect for her birthday outing to the zoo.

 

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