diy: wee felt house & a little mouse

wee felt house and tiny mouse Wee Felt House & A Little Mouse

Supplies:
Wee Felt House & A Little Mouse Template
3 – 12″ x 12″ wool felt rolls
Felted flowers and balls
Various scraps of felt or wool felt (for the mouse)
Coordinating embroidery floss
Embroidery needle
Poly-fil (for the mouse)
Snap buttons
Scissors
Button
Fabric glue
Pins

wee felt house and tiny mouse Directions:
1. Using your template as a guide to cut out the triangle portions of the house roof. For the body of the house, cut out five 5″ squares from your wool felt fabric. For the side of the house roof, cut out two 4″ x 5″ wool felt pieces. For the windows, cut out three 2″ squares, and for the door, cut out a 2″ x 4″ piece of wool felt.

wee felt house and tiny mouse 2. Hand sew your door and windows onto four of the 5″ squares, set aside one to be the bottom of the house.

wee felt house and tiny mouse 3. Pin the four walls of the house to one of the four sides to the bottom of the house. To attach, use a blanket stitch to connect each piece together. Go around sewing the all four sides of the bottom of the house. Continue sewing together the corners of each house. Then, sew three sides of the top of the house. Leave the top back of the house free of stitching.

wee felt house and tiny mouse wee felt house and tiny mouse 4. To make the roof of the house, pin together the long side of the two 4″ x 5″ pieces together, then pin the ends to the two sides of the triangle (the 5″ side of the triangle should line up with the bottom of the roof. Blanket stitch all sides of the roof together, but leave the back bottom of the roof free of stitching. Then, pin together the back bottom of the roof to the top back of the house, and blanket stitch those two edges together.

Cut out a 1″ x 8″ piece of wool felt, sew each short end 3″ down from the top center of the roof with a blanket stitch, and continue to blanket stitch all the way around. This is the handle of the house. Using fabric glue, add the felt flowers and balls to decorate the house. This can also be hand sewn on as well.

Sew on the snap buttons onto the top right and left of the house; one stud on the bottom center of the roof, and one socket on the top center of the house body.

wee house and a little felt mouse wee felt house and tiny mouse wee felt house and tiny mouse Wee Felt Mouse

Directions:
1. Cut out the felt pieces for your mouse using the template. Stitch on the inner ears onto one of the mouse body pieces; this will be the front of your mouse. Place the front and back mouse body pieces together, with the right side facing out, and stitch all the way around the edges of the mouse to create the mouse body. Leave a small opening, lightly stuff with Poly-Fil, and then continue to sew the opening closed.

wee felt house and tiny mouse 2. Sew a strand of floss up through the bottom for the little legs of the mouse. Sew on a little felt foot on each end and knot. The bottom of the feet end up dangling about 1″ down from the base of the body. Sew another strand of floss through one side of the body and out the other side for the mouse arms. Sew felt hands on each end and knot. The arms and hands extend about 1″ out on each side of the mouse body.

wee felt house and tiny mouse 3. Embroider on the face of your mouse and add any additional touches you may like. I added a tiny bow tie on mine. With your embroidery floss, add on a tail at the back of your mouse.

wee felt house and tiny mouse 4. Line up the three cheese block sides with a triangle and stitch all the sides together to the triangle. Continue to sew the sides of the cheese block, and then add the bottom triangle and continue to stitch all the sides of that piece on. Before stitching the cheese block closed, add a tiny bit of Poly-Fil, and then stitch the cheese block closed. Make sure that all the sides, edges, and corners of the cheese block are stitched together. I had made all the pieces for this tiny mouse when I felt like he was missing something. Then it dawned on me: this little guy needs a cheese block. I think it was the perfect addition!

wee felt house and tiny mouse wee felt house and tiny mouse wee felt house and tiny mouse wee felt house & a little mouse Isn’t this wee house and little mouse so cute?! He’s the perfect little friend to tote around with his wee house. You could also use the template to make a whole family of mice! There is certainly room for more to live in the house. This tiny house from a small box could also be used for the mouse (or mice) to live in.  It’s a present for one of the girls, but I’m tempted to give it to her already. To help fight the temptation, I better wrap it up for Christmas and put it under the tree. This project is a fun one to make and would definitely be a good present to make for Christmas. It’s also a great project to do with older children, and they could make little mice for friends.

Supplies for this project was provided as part of the Michaels Makers series.

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diy: some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatters

game Some Cans, Ping Pong Balls, and Fly Swatters

Supplies:
Cans (or even a box)
Ping pong balls
Fly swatters
Duct tape
Non-stick scissors

some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter Directions:
Decorate the cans.

To play the game:
Set out the cans on it’s side, give the each player a fly swatter, and the objective is to get the ping pong balls in the can. Another variation, is to gather a few more cans, sit them upright and have children walk and maneuver the balls around the cans.

some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter some cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatter My girls wanted to draw arrows on the ground so they knew where to aim, and they took turns pairing up trying to get the ping pong balls in the cans. It’s a good activity for developing their hand and eye coordination. I love how something as simple as tin cans, ping pong balls, and fly swatters (we don’t use these to swat flies, but to play games like this) can provide children entertainment. The game was taken from their book Unplugged Play, and this was an activity they picked out to do. I shared about the book here, and it’s one of their favorites to flip through to find projects and activities.

I would totally wear all their outfits in these photos, well, except maybe not the fox tights. I love those tights, but on an adult, I don’t think they would be as cute, at least not on me. The personalities are so evident in the outfits they choose for themselves. Brave is rockin’ that flannel, of course in red and blue (always check the boy section at Old Navy, lots of good stuff for girls too!). Soul, the most girly dresser of them all, must wear a dress (or a skirt), and True likes to mimic the styles I’m into. She knows I love my leopard boots (and sneakers), so this is her way of matching me. I wish her leopard sweater came in my size, so maybe it’s the other way around, and I want to be like True. Glow has started voicing her thoughts on what she wants to wear, so it will be interesting to see how her style evolves since she has three older sisters she can mimic.

on true: leopard sweater, drapey-ankle pants, leopard sneakers, c/o old navy. hat, gap kids. on brave: plaid flannel, denim, c/o old navy. shoes, vans. on soul: ruffled dress, denim jacket, fox tights, c/o old navy. shoes, superga. on glow: striped moto jacket, skinny jeans, high-top sneakers, c/o old navy.

This post is sponsored by Old Navy. Thank you for taking the time to visit this space as I’m very thankful for the support you give me and the brands I partner with.

 

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diy: homemade thank you cards

thank you cards Homemade Thank You Cards

Supplies:
Thank You Card Printable
Cardstock
Scissors
Various paints
Paintbrush
Pens

Directions:
Print out the cards onto cardstock and cut it across the middle horizontally. First, paint any design you might want behind the words, and allow that to dry completely. Then, fill in the words with paint or marker (or fill in lettering with paint).

I used watercolor on most of them, and others I used black paint, with a very fine paint brush, to fill it in. Using marker would work to fill in the lettering too. Honestly, I just enjoy making my own cards, and you don’t really need much direction with these. Just print them out and have fun! I prefer homemade cards over store bought ones. Once upon a time, I wanted to make my own line of cards (way back in college when Ben and I just started dating and I was even making my own paper!).

thank you cards thank you cards thank you cards thank you cards thank you cards I don’t think I let the people in my life know exactly why I’m thankful for them, so this week the girls and I are going to sit down, and write out thank you cards for our loved ones (and mail them out too!). I’ll let them decorate their own and write their own messages. They are always sending letters to their Grandmama, so I’m sure they will love this challenge.

 

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christmas tree decorating tips

tree stuff I’m definitely not a pro when it comes to putting together a fancy Christmas tree. I go for the sweet and simple when it comes to tree decorating, but I wanted to share some tips I remember my mom teaching me when we decorated the Christmas tree growing up…

-Spread out all the branches. We never had a real tree growing up, just my parents’ preference, so we had to take time to spread out all the wire-y branches.
-Don’t just put ornaments hanging from the edge of the branches, but put them in closer to the trunk too. You want to give use your ornaments to give your tree some depth.
-Check the tree from all angles. Everything might look fine and dandy from one side, but you look from another angle, and there’s a spot (or two) that need some ornaments. Make sure to spread them out!

tree stuff tree stuff tree stuff tree stuff tree stuff Besides the wooden ornaments from Michaels (we purchased these straw ones from eBay), I also created some additional ones with the wooden balls. I bought some tiny eye screws, drilled a tiny hole in each wooden ball (okay, had Ben drill holes!), then screwed in the eye-screw (okay, Ben did that too!). The girls added some string (they really did that!) and we hung them up!

When I was little, I would be gung-ho about decorating the tree as soon as my parents brought it out. Then, my drive would fizzle out at some point, and I would sit there and watch my mom finish it. She always took special care to make the tree just perfect for all of us. I love the festive feeling my mom (and dad) created in our home growing up, and I’m thankful for the opportunity to do that for my girls now.

If you want more tree inspiration, stop by The Glue String to see all 30 of the Michaels Makers’ trees. Some of them are pretty awesome. Like I said in this post, I would totally lose in a tree decorating contest.

Supplies for this project are provided by Michaels as part of the Michaels Makers series. No additional compensation was provided.

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diy: tiny house from a box

tiny house from a box Tiny House From a Box

Supplies:
Tiny House Template
Cereal box (we used a box from a bakery, but a doughnut or cereal box would work too)
Scissors

tiny slotted house from a box Directions: Using the template, cut out all the necessary pieces from your box. Accordion fold the piece for the stairs, and decorate the house any way you would like. Put the house together, and there you go!

tiny slotted house from a box tiny slotted house from a box tiny slotted house from a box tiny slotted house from a box tiny slotted house from a box It’s a small house, and a cereal box would do just as well to make it. If you do one with a pink doughnut box, I think that would be really cute too. The girls and I are having fun repurposing boxes into toys. They want to make another tiny house with our Trader Joe’s cereal box, but after that, we want to try a castle. If you want to make a larger dollhouse from a box, don’t forget this one!

 

 

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yup, it’s a christmas tree post already

christmas tree christmas tree christmas tree christmas tree christmas tree christmas tree christmas tree I know. You probably still have that Halloween hangover, and I’m on to Christmas already. It seems I even skipped over Thanksgiving. Trust me, this doesn’t feel natural. This is part of the Michaels Makers Series though and today is the day we are all sharing our Christmas tree with you.

Growing up, my mom went all out for the holidays. I remember one year, I went with her to the day after Christmas sale at Bullocks (anyone remember that department store?!), and was helping her buy all the gold ornaments we could find. She bought lots of ornaments that day, but every year after that our Christmas tree lit up with a lot of sparkling gold. She had a theme and she was sticking with it. Twenty years later, that theme is still going strong every Christmas and her tree always looks like it belongs in a department store.

Here we are today, and I’m a more simple Christmas tree decorator. Usually, we just put up felt ball garland on the tree and that’s that. Though with Michaels Dream Tree Challenge, I had to work to get beyond the felt ball garland. I pinned some images, and this one was by far my favorite. Another simple tree, but I loved it so much. The girls and I set out to Michael’s to see what we could find to recreate it, and to my surprise, there were lots of wooden ornaments. I’m sure they are meant to be painted, but we aren’t doing any of that. We scooped up the ones we liked, as well as some wooden beads, and large wooden balls. We don’t have a star on top because I haven’t figured out one for that just yet.

So it’s November 1st, the turkey hasn’t even been bought yet, but we have a Christmas tree up in our home. I’m sure our neighbors noticed the twinkle lights in the front window when the girls and I are decorating it, and they probably think we’re crazy. Heck, I think it’s kind of crazy too, but my aunt and uncle get their Christmas tree up October 1st, and they have like 5 Christmas trees up in their home (each decorated to the nines), so I’m late if I’m going by their standards.

Don’t forget to stop by Michaels blog, The Glue String, to see all the trees that were out on November 1st by other Michaels Makers. If you’re in need of a tree, head into Michaels from November 2 through November 8 for the Make It Merry Event and get 50% off all trees 6ft. or taller. Then, you can join me in getting strange looks from your neighbors for having yours up so early too! We do have one neighbor who has had an artificial Christmas tree sitting on his front balcony for about 5 years straight now, so maybe we aren’t so strange after all. Happy November first friends!

Supplies for this project are provided by Michaels as part of the Michaels Makers series. No additional compensation was provided.

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